Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

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TheRightfulKing2013
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Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

Post by TheRightfulKing2013 » Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:17 pm

Puysegur, a soldier under Turenne, claimed that under Turenne, the use of the pistol by the French cavalry had ended (Turenne died in 1675). But on the other hand, in 1691 the Royal Carbiniers were raised, suggesting to some that firearm use by cavalry might have been reintroduced to some degree.

To what extent did the cavalry in the Nine Years War use firearms? Did it vary from country to country? Is it true that the Dutch tended to charge rather than fire? What about the German states and Austria?

I understand that for the Carolean army, its traditionally said that Charles XII did not allow the charge except maybe for scouting. But what about Charles XI? Was this already the case by the time of the NYW?

In particular to what extent did dragoons fire from horseback in this war?

Thanks in advance.
Dfogleman2
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Re: Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

Post by Dfogleman2 » Wed Jun 12, 2019 2:05 am

The Swedish tactic at the Battle of Lund in 1676 was to charge with pistol in hand and fire when they could see “the whites of the enemy’s eyes.” The sword was then drawn in the melee. This was specifically referred to as “in the French manner.”
TheRightfulKing2013
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Re: Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

Post by TheRightfulKing2013 » Mon Jun 17, 2019 12:09 pm

Dfogleman2 wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 2:05 am
The Swedish tactic at the Battle of Lund in 1676 was to charge with pistol in hand and fire when they could see “the whites of the enemy’s eyes.” The sword was then drawn in the melee. This was specifically referred to as “in the French manner.”
Yes but the date when the Carolean reforms were introduced is seen as being 1683 and while Charles XII is reputed as only allowing his cavalry 6 bullets each so they would concentrate on the charge instead, its not completely clear to me if Charles XI had the same point of view by the time of the Nine Years War (NYW).
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Friedrich August I.
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Re: Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

Post by Friedrich August I. » Mon Jun 17, 2019 4:03 pm

The saying goes that pictures tell you more than a thousand words ->

Imageu228-058 by GÜNTER HEIM, auf Flickr

Saxon Cuirassier 1682
„Macht Euch Euren Dregg alleene“

"Sort your filth out by yourself!" The King of Saxony Friedrich August III., at his abdication 1918, referred to the quarrels in the parliament and the squabbling within the provisional government.
Old John
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Re: Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

Post by Old John » Tue Jun 18, 2019 6:42 am

have a look for Helion publication, century of the Soldier no 40 "Charles XI's War" Scania WAR, could be helpful
cheers Old John
Dfogleman2
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Re: Did cavalry use pistols in NYW?

Post by Dfogleman2 » Sat Jun 22, 2019 3:22 am

TheRightfulKing2013 wrote:
Mon Jun 17, 2019 12:09 pm
Dfogleman2 wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 2:05 am
The Swedish tactic at the Battle of Lund in 1676 was to charge with pistol in hand and fire when they could see “the whites of the enemy’s eyes.” The sword was then drawn in the melee. This was specifically referred to as “in the French manner.”
Yes but the date when the Carolean reforms were introduced is seen as being 1683 and while Charles XII is reputed as only allowing his cavalry 6 bullets each so they would concentrate on the charge instead, its not completely clear to me if Charles XI had the same point of view by the time of the Nine Years War (NYW).
That is correct, but my point was that in the Franco-Dutch War “the French manner” contemplated the use of pistols.
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