French Garde du Corps bandoleers

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footslogger
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French Garde du Corps bandoleers

Post by footslogger » Thu Dec 27, 2018 1:13 am

I'm looking at these in my Robert Hall book. I'm trying to figure out what they actually look like. There are little squares of different colors for each of the regiments. What are they? Purely a decoration that is painted on? Or is it somehow raised?

Thanks.
Glorfindel
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Re: French Garde du Corps bandoleers

Post by Glorfindel » Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:59 pm

I've looked at both the Osprey and David Wilson's book :

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_no ... ian+wilson


It appears that each of the four Company's wore a bandoleer with silk squares in
the Company colour, each of which is surrounded with plentiful silver lace, thus
forming a check effect.

This image is from 1743 but I expect it gives a good idea of what it would look
like :


Image
footslogger
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Re: French Garde du Corps bandoleers

Post by footslogger » Fri Dec 28, 2018 7:13 pm

That's perfect, thanks!

I guess they would normally have a carbine hung from that bandoleer, or was it always worn regardless?
Glorfindel
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Re: French Garde du Corps bandoleers

Post by Glorfindel » Sun Dec 30, 2018 10:30 am

Sorry, can't answer that specific question - I'm sure someone on this Forum will know (they are good
like that).



Phil
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Re: French Garde du Corps bandoleers

Post by Friedrich August I. » Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:45 pm

I believe that this might answer your Question about the Bandolier and its use

https://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1235588&t=w

And here is a link to the Collection if you want to look for yourself

https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/col ... navigation
„Macht Euch Euren Dregg alleene“

"Sort your filth out by yourself!" The King of Saxony Friedrich August III., at his abdication 1918, referred to the quarrels in the parliament and the squabbling within the provisional government.
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